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of the year to avoid the fiscal cliff, automatic federal spending cuts could impact the foot we eat. emily schmidt explains. >> preparing for holidays is a reminder of something else around the corner. >> i just can't imagine funding being cut at this point. it was be tragic. >> she is worried budget cuts would hurt food safety inspection. that's mattered to her since her twins her born in 1999. she and her babies got listeria poisoning. contaminated food sickens about 48 million a year. 3,000 die. so the fda and usda are charged with protecting the simply. an 8.2 budget cut translates to $157 million. there's no word exactly what cuts would mean to staffing. >> both fda and usda are stretched pretty thin when it comes to the activities they do. they need increased resources and not fewer. >> agencies always say they're stretched. >> dean clancy is with freedom works and says the cuts leave nothing to fear. >> arguing that getting spending under control endangers public health and safety is a really irresponsible scare tactic. especially when you realize that these aren't real cuts. these
're going to be talking a lot more about the fiscal cliff in the coming hour. three cnn i-reporters are going to be joining me to talk about their real concerns about this and we got some answers from our business expert from questions that were sent by you that you tweeted to us. that's going to be coming up in about 15 minutes. >>> bail was set for dallas cowboys josh brent, he's been charged with intoxication manslaughter for a crash on saturday that killed his teammate. police say brent was pulling jerry brown out of the car when they arrived. dallas coach jason garrett talked about his players just a few minutes ago. >> obviously this is a very difficult situation, a tragedy occurred to our football team. in the last couple of days. and we lost jerry brown, practiced roster player for us who we picked up earlier in the year. and it's been really emotion for everybody and as the head coach of the team, i have to talk to the team and i have to inform them what happened, give them the news and then try to offer some perspective. you know, i talked a lot got the value of
's fiscal cliff. >> there's a real correlation, people have jobs they spend money, if people are worried about losing their jobs, or don't have a job, they're not going to go out that much, they're going to cook at home or stay home. >> reporter: just a couple miles in the pentagon, many of the people here work directly for the defense department and it's contractors. the defense industry is facing $125 billion of direct -- in addition several key tax ben fis are scheduled to expire at the end of the year that will have a direct impact on the pocket books of many americans. take a couple with one child in new york earning $100,000. their tax rate jumps from 25% to 28%. they could be hit by the alternative minimum tax. the child tax credit drops from $1,000 to $500 and payroll taxes could be $2,000 more next year. for a single 25-year-old in michigan who works full-time earning $30,000 a year going to school part-time, his tax rate would stay the same at 15%. but he would lose the american education tax credit and have to pay more than $600 in payroll taxes. and even though it's weeks bef
men left standing between all of us and the fiscal cliff. in 25 days america goes over the edge. that's when severe tax hikes and cuts in spending begin. according to the "new york times," john boehner has asked democratic leaders to step aside so he and the president can attempt to negotiate a deal one-on-one and no one is objecting. paul steinhauser is live from washington. paul, you got some new polling for us. what do americans want to see in a deal? >> it's interesting what they want to see and what they don't want to see. one of the biggest sticking points between democrats and republicans over averting the fiscal cliff is raising taxes on those making over $250,000 a year. look at this from quinnipiac university, the question was asked are you okay with that? 65% say they support such a move to avert the fiscal cliff. this is the third poll over the last two weeks to show the same thing, that most americans are okay with raising those taxes on incomes over $250,000 a year. go to the next screen, there's a partisan divide here. this explains why most republicans are dead set aga
a deal on the fiscal cliff or else automatic spending cuts and tax hikes will kick in and with the fiscal cliff looming, our consumers feeling at all concerned? christine romans joins us now from new york with that. good morning, christine. >> good morning, ted. first, let me tell you what's going right in the economy for consumers. there's a whole host of things. the job markets, 7.7% unemployment, the lowest in four years. you've got the housing market showing signs of recovery. rising home values in much of the country. gas prices, did you notice? they're down 46 cents over the past couple of months. they're expected to keep going lower and the dow is up 20 points now. the dow is above 1,300 and the s&p 500 is up 12% this year. so, what could go wrong? fiscal cliff. this is something weighing op consumer sentiment and we're starting to see it in the weekly -- look at this -- 39% said it would affect it some. they don't seem to have much faith in congress to fix it and any time except 11th hour and maybe a week into the new year and there's this payroll tax holiday that most people have
putting his foot down. he says no tax hikes for the wealthy, no deal. america hits that fiscal cliff in 27 days and that means tax hikes and deep spending cuts if the democrats and the republicans can't come together in some kind of a deal and with just ten days remaining until congress is scheduled to go home for the holidays, the clock ticking. here's what he told bloomberg news. listen. >> we're going to have to see the rates on the top 2% go up and we're not going to be able it to get a deal without it. >> we start this morning with white house correspondent dan lothian, he's in washington, d.c. okay. so who's got the ball in their court at this point then, dan? >> well, you know, i think the house gop, they have presented their counteroffer which white house spokesman jay carney is referring to as, quote, magic beans and fairy dust. we expect that house republicans will keep putting pressure on the white house to engage, push for more details on what the white house will accept when it comes to additional entitlement cuts. but i think what's unclear is what kind of negotiating is goin
are talking about the fiscal cliff, 25 days away until these tax hikes and federal spending cuts go into effect. you are looking at wall street. it is not making any big moves because of the uncertainty of what is going to happen with this. how long are politicians going to continue dragging their feet. and it is not just wall street. you know, it is beginning to eat into consumer confidence. we just got this index, university of michigan consumer confidence index. just a short time ago, this morning. it showed that consumer confidence plunged and in the first week of its month because americans don't know what to expect taxwise. that's a bad sign for retailers at the most important time of the year. the holidays. because guess what, if consumers aren't feeling confident, they are no going to spend. that domino effect that hit retailers, many of these retailers depend on the holiday sales to push them into a profit important the year. this is what's weighing out there in -- you know, for consumers, yes. fiscal cliff definitely weighing on things. despite the fact that the jobs numbe
airport, across the potomac from washington. so, sandra, if we hit this fiscal cliff, all the spending cuts kick in, what effect will that have on air travel? >> reporter: the big unknown is still how it will affect the everyday traveler. and that is certainly something a lot of people here are wanting to figure out. as for the air traffic controllers union, they released a statement this afternoon saying that it would be a major blow to the airline industry as well as the economy if these cuts are in effect. now, overall, we're talking about a nearly $2.2 billion projected cut to the department of transportation. half of that would come from the faa, and the tsa would suffer a $643 million spending cut. so according to the head of the tsa, they do have a plan b. they have a plan in place ready to go if these cuts are in place. now, he says that the overall front line operations would not be effective, but this would be a major severe budget cut and a lot of travelers here we spoke to, brooke, say they are paying close attention to the negotiations. >> it does concern me because, yes,
up fiscal cliff, we're now seeing house speaker boehner discussing the issue from the house floor. the first time he's commented publicly after meeting with president obama sunday. let's listen. >>> right flonow the american people have to be wondering when is the president going to get serious. i yield back. >> the chair recognizes the gentlemen from pennsylvania mr. altmire, for five minutes. >> i rise to recognize victor decarlo for receiving the -- >> we have been listening to the house speaker talking about negotiations taking place with the president obviously, a lot of people watching closely, trying to avoid the fiscal cliff which would mean tax hikes for almost all americans but also severe cuts as well. they are debating that publicly as well as privately. i want to talk more about the rebel group that we had mention before in syria, that is now designated a new terrorist organization, cnn's hala gorani joining us atlanta. hala, first of all, you've got the syrian rebels, they're there fighting al assad's government. now the u.s. government, state department, steps in an
increases and spending cuts that people here in washington call the fiscal cliff. most house members are going home today with only 27 days to make a deal. two house leaders who are not going home are with me in the situation room. they're working very hard to avoid the fiscal cliff. thanks so much for coming in. for so long, republicans wanted to extend the bush tax cuts forever, now for 98% of the american people, the democrats are saying, we're ready. we've given up, we'll let you have those bush tax cuts for as long as possible. let's just resolve that, we'll move on to some of the tougher issues later. let's make sure that 98% of the american families have these lower tax rates into next year. why not give that? >> the debate over those top two pshsz, is really a strong man debate. what we need is tax reform in america. we need a simpler less complicated tax code. >> i agree with you. we need a tax reform. why not resolve this one issue, make sure taxes don't increase for 98% of the americans, 100% of americans for their first $250,000 a year. let them have that, and then move o
on negotiations to avoid the massive tax hikes and spending cuts that we know as the fiscal cliff. why did frankie muniz have a mini stroke sat age 27 in the former "malcolm in the middle" star will join us to talk to us about the health scare. >>> new world order, asia returning to the power it last held in the middle ages, what this means for the u.s. >>> i'm okay. >> a ceiling collapses in the middle of an interview, a storm tears through the south. we'll have an update on the damage straight ahead. >>> we're rocking out this morning, juk lavell, the fifth rolling stone will talk about the stones tour, tuesday, december 11th and "starting point" begins right now. >>> welcome back, bob shrum, ryan lizza, from "the new yorker" john berman have a seat, christine romans sticking around to help us out. our "starting point" zipped lips on capitol hill, how rare is that. if silence is golden maybe we'll have a deal on the fiscal cliff crisis sometime soon. there's 21 days left before the tax hikes and spending cuts kick in to send us over the cliff or down that gentle slope as some like to call it. co
and lawmakers in washington continue to push america's economy toward a fiscal cliff. both sides promising to cut trillions in government spending over the next decade but republicans insist it could be done without raising taxes on the rich. president obama ib cysts it's a nonstarter. it's a mess. no one can argue that. what happens if there is no deal? are we, as some argue, making too much of the fiscal cliff deadline? would it be a catastrophe to hit it, go over it? maybe for a while. joining me from london, the host of quest means business on cnn international. i have 60 seconds to set you straight on this. i'll go first. [ bell ringing ] all right. it could be catastrophic if congress doesn't get a deal by january 1. the government will try to soften the blow of spending cuts and tax increases. they could delay the withholdings that people pay though tax rates are going up or they could tell agencies to accelerate the spending at the new year to mitigate cuts that are coming. that assumes congress will do something. otherwise it could be catastrophic. i say, don't count on it. if a d
the fiscal cliff. in 22 days we go over that edge. that's when sweeping tax hikes and spending cuts kick in unless a deal gets done. after 23 days without uttering a word to each other face-to-face, that is, president obama and house speaker john boehner sat down at the white house yesterday. they talked. so let's bring in brianna keilarment she is live in washington. so congress is scheduled to break for the holidays later this week. where do we go from here? how are these talks? >> we don't know. that's the thing. we know they spoke. in fact, it's somewhat remarkable that both the white house and speaker boehner's office put out statements simply saying that the two men had spoken. the lines of communication are open. and they were the same verbatim. that is something you can look at as some progress, perhaps. certainly it is promising may be the better way to put it. there is coordination there. they seem to be talking in good faith, trying to keep, i guess, their cards very close to the vest. and that is something that maybe is seen as promising. again, there is no word on actual pro
'll fix our problem. and that's essentially what the fiscal cliff is, but it's just too much of these solutions that the fiscal cliff presents, how am i going to word that? it's too much austerity and it is too much tax increases at least, for the budget, or the for the economy to manage. so my question is, that was very wordy, how much is too much, how much is too late to try to just stabilize the problem we're in? >> well, ashleigh, you described the problem, really, it's not just the immediate fiscal cliff, it's this big thing in my book, savage truth on money. i've had that book about how we really are coming to an impasse. and the only way out is economic growth. that's only way the individual family -- you know, if you have a budget problem, if you could only get a better-paying job. if someone else in your family could work, you'd solve your problems right away. the same thing for the united states economy. we need to grow. we won't grow until we have confidence. confidence for business to expand, for banks to lend, for consumers to go out and buy that new house, and w
in the fiscal cliff crisis. it's getting quiet on capitol hill. 21 days remain before the tax hikes and spending cuts kick in, and congress breaks for the holiday, at least they are scheduled to, on friday. this is what you need to know. the president on the road pitching his tax plan to workers at a truck plant in michigan. house speaker boehner were conducting behind the scenes talks with the white house. and the posturing and finger pointing in washington suddenly stopped. we have more from washington. the sounds of silence may be the sounds of progress? >> potentially. we hope so. we don't really know. we're forced to read the tea leaves essentially, john, because neither side is giving details about the substance of discussions. let me read a statement from john boehner's press secretary. "discussions with the white house are taking place, but we have no detail to share about the substance of those conversations. the republican offer made last week remains the republican offer and we continue to wait for the president to identify the spending cuts he's willing to make as part of the balance
, health care and housing assistance are being called the fiscal cliff. the only way to i void it is for president obama and congress to make a deal, cutting spending and raising revenue. adding to the sense of urgency. news that 350,000 people simply gave up looking for work in the month of november. and while that drove the unemployment rate down to 7.7%, the fiscal cuts and tax hikes are expected to dramatically slow job creation and increase unemployment possibly plunging the economy back into a recession. let's go to dana joining us from capitol hill. the latest negotiations don't seem to be going anywhere. >> they sure don't. the house speaker ended the week by calling it a wasted week. he only had one phone call with the president of the united states and he said it was just, "more of the same." now counter offer to what the republicans put out during the week which was $800 billion in new tax revenue. so there's certainly a lot of frustration. particularly right now on the side of republicans who understand that democrats have the leverage right now. but on friday, the
of the fiscal cliff negotiations. the mortgage interest deduction. government spending on this will reach $100 million by 2014, making it the third largest tax break on the books. who does it help? 41 million people. the most recent irs data showed that 41 million people claimed this deduction on their 2010 tax returns. the tax policy center says it tends to benefit upper middle class families the most. these bars show income in the circles the average savings. for those with incomes of less than $40,000 a year, their savings is $91, look at the people who make $250,000 and more. their average savings is about $5500. this benefits people most on both coasts and cities like chicago, with higher property prices, and we watch the fiscal cliff negotiations closely for what could happen next to this tax goody next year. >> here's the question i'm hearing people ask, if we go off the cliff here, how big a hit will we take on taxs? stand by, because i'm about to give you the closest answer i possibly can. to help me with that is laurie montgomery, she is the fiscal policy reporter for the washington
on one. keep in mind they're the ones trying to do the deal here to avert this fiscal cliff. the tax hikes, the spending cutting scheduled for the first of the week now. join ming me from washington is senator olympia snowe. are you hearing -- what might you be hearing between the president and spirit? >> i think it is optimistic in the sense that at least they have met once again because i think that that is going to be crucial and central to any resolution, to the fiscal cliff crisis. and the more they meet and more that they have these lines of communications opened on a daily basis and their staffs are meeting, the more likely we'll see a conclusion to this issue. but it is regrettable that it is this late in the day, given the uncertainty and the apprehension that it continues to create among the american people, and, of course, both within the markets here and abroad. but i think it is hopeful that they have begun to meet and have some discussions because i think we can breathe a sigh of relief that the lines of communication are open. >> are you breathing that sigh of relief?
're not having a conversation about spending. the republicans and democrats alike designed the fiscal cliff. it's a series of bipartisan compromises and i think it's kind of foolish to think that this group of congressmen and senators is going to come up with a way out of something they themselves designed. >> rich, you worked for a republican speaker who went up against a democratic president over the spending issues. back then the face-off didn't turn out all that well for your party. obviously very difficult era. do you agree with eric's take? is the right strategy for republicans to stick to their guns, forget about compromise? >> no. i really don't -- eric is one of my favorite people. we talk a lot. but i think that, and i did work for the speaker gingrich during the shut-down fight in '96, and it did not work out well for republicans. the president has a much bigger bully pulpit than the speaker does. newt gingrich's bully pulpit was pretty big back in those days but at some point, republicans in the house -- and i think boehner is trying to look for ways to do this, speaker boehner, tha
to the fiscal cliff and not one iota closer to a deal to avoid it. now, on january 1st, four weeks from today, automatic tax hikes and spending cuts kick in with potentially serious consequences for virtually every taxpayer in this country. there has been zero progress on a deal, zero. keeping them honest though, the american people clearly want a compromise, polls show they want results. but the two sides are still far apart on the issue at the heart of the debate, whether the wealthiest americans should pay more taxes than they do right now. the people you elected to get things done, they're not getting them done, not even close. in a cnn/orc poll taken a few weeks ago, 67% said washington officials would behave like spoiled children in fiscal cliff discussions. only 28% said they would behave like responsible adults. with that in mind, here's what the key players, the grownups, have said in just the past 24 hours. listen. >> the math, it doesn't work. >> his proposal was so outlandish, i don't think we should go back to the table until he puts something there that we can work with. >> we'r
in government spending as part of a deal to avert the fiscal cliff. not when it comes to entitlements. according to three new surveys a majority say no to raising the eligibility age for medicare. does the public think politicians in washington will hammer out a deal before the end of the year deadline? americans appear divided. a plurality in one poll say yes. a plurality in another are pessimistic. one thing most people agree on -- they want both sides to compromise to get a deal done. joe? >> cnn political editor paul steinhauser. thanks. coming up, a story and you ask yourself how could this happen? a baby girl caught in a custody battle between her biological father and the adoptive parents who said he never knew she was put up for adoption. our legal guys weigh in on the case. save you 15% today if you open up a charge card account with us. >> announcer: we all love a good deal during the holidays, especially identity thieves. they can open an account in your name and go on a serious spending spree. >> do you have cufflinks? >> mm-hmm. >> gold ones? >> announcer: not on our watch. we're li
the fiscal cliff is coming to town. ma merry cliff-mas. jim? >> the president is asking for $1.6 trillion. >> entitlement reform. >> discretionary spending. [ applause [ applause ] >> i'm back. what happened? >> they are still trying to reach a resolution in the fiscal cliff talks. it's getting a little heated between president obama and speaker boehner. take a look at what they've been saying to each other. yesterday obama said, quote, if we can get some leadership on the republican side, we can probably solve this in about a week. it's not that tough. boehner then responded saying, quote, i've sent the president our proposal. if he doesn't like our plan, he should come back with a plan of his own. obama responded to that saying, maybe i will. to which boehner replied, maybe i will. and mr. obama replied, stop copying me. so which boehner replied, stop copying me. >> to which obama replied dam infinity. you win for now boehner. >> according to a new poll that just came out, most americans think santa claus is a democrat. which is odd because you think of white, old, fat men that hire uns
over the fight in the fiscal cliff. americans face crushing tax hikes and severe spending cuts in 27 days if democrats and republicans cannot come together on a deal. by the way, congress breaks for the holidays in ten days. slash that number. in an interview with bloomberg news, the president made it crystal clear he's not about to blink on the issue of tax hikes for the wealthiest americans. >> we'll have to see the rates on the top 2% go up. and we're not going to be able to get a deal without it. >> white house correspondent dan lothian joins us live from washington this morning. very nice to see you, dan. >> good to see you. >> here's the deal. we have republicans pitted against democrats. now we understand there are issues amongst republicans as well. >> that's right. they're in a tough spot here. they don't want to be in left in a position of being blamed for the fiscal cliff. you're seeing a division between house members and senate members. the reason for this is mainly over the 800 billion in new tax revenue. this was part of john boehner and plan. those tea party-backed co
cuts that would be imposed by the fiscal cliff would be devastating. it would send unemployment higher. it would cost jobs. the republicans, as peter says, are going to insist on some cuts anyway, so bottom line is we are going to see a weaker economy into the beginning of next year. probably one way or the other. now, the counter to that, peter, is that there are forces in the economy that are strengthening it. this energy boom that we've got, the natural gas, the amount of fracturing that we're doing, the fact that housing has been doing tremendously well, and interest rates remain very low with prices, so there's some sense that there's a bit of a renaissance on the horizon, and if the government doesn't mess that up too much, 2013 could end up being as good as 2012 if not a little better. i don't know if you completely disagree with that, peter, but i think there's enough good going on that it could offset the bad. >> to you think it could go up to 10% unemployment. do you agree with peter on that? >> i don't know. i don't know if it will go go up to 10%. there are two scenarios. o
, spending cuts. that's what the fiscal cliff is all about. it would all start with the start of the new year. i want to get to senator jeff merkley. he's a democrat from the state of oregon. he's on both the budget committee and the banking, housing, and urban affairs committee. nice to have you with us, sir. thanks for joining us. >> you're welcome. >> thank you. before we get to fiscal cliff, let's talk a little bit about syria. there are now reports that they may be loading the components that would make up sarin gas. and i'm curious to know and i think a lot of people are watching this, does this mean that we are headed, the united states is headed into military action considering what we know about the red line, if you will, that hillary clinton laid out pretty clearly? >> it was very important for her to draw a very clear line. because any use of chemical weapons has to be responded to internationally. i'm sure the secretary of state is immersed with russia right now, is in negotiations with russia for a united front against this absolutely unacceptable possibility. >> okay. so she's l
spending would slow. this is the so-called fiscal cliff. now, it is clear what higher taxes would do. but what about budget cuts? who would that affect? a lot of folks including several million unemployed workers. watch this story with me from cnn's kyung lah. >> reporter: she doesn't call it a fiscal cliff. what she could be facing at year's end is a financial free fall. >> i don't know. i just wish i wasn't in this situation, but it is what it is. and i can just do what i can. >> reporter: she lost her job as a new home sales manager last january. on an old laptop, with a broken cord, she applies for job after job, keeping track in a packed notebook. >> seven, eight, nine. >> reporter: averaging 15 applications a day. at age 54, this is the first time she's been on unemployment. she emptied out her 401(k), her savings and now the last resort, the emergency federal jobless program has kept her in her town home, giving her $450 a week. but on december 29th, unless congress and the white house act, the money stops. >> we're not trying to live off the system. we're trying to survive. i
are talking again. but that is about the only thing close to progress in efforts to avoid the fiscal cliff. president obama used his weekly address insisting he is ready to make the tough decisions on spending cuts. >> i am willing to make more entitlement spending cuts on top of the one trillion in spending cuts i signed into law last year. but if we're serious about reducing our deficit while still investing in things like education and research that are important to growing our economy, and if we're serious about protecting middle class families then we're also going to have to ask the wealthiest americans to pay higher tax rates. that is one principle i wouldn't compromise on. >> speaker john boehner has a different view. he says the president needs to abandon what he called his "my way or the highway approach," in his words. if the president does that a lot of things are possible. >>> syrian rebels are battling army units around the capital. activists say 26 people were killed in the damascus suburbs today, while 29 more were killed around the country. meanwhile, the u.s. and other of
of this is that some people are trying to downplay the affects of the fiscal cliff saying if we go over for a few days it will be okay. ceos aren't saying that. you look at third quarter gdp, companies are spending less money on software and equipment because they don't know what's going to happen. the effects of the fiscal cliff are already holding back some things. >> of course. what stood out to me from howard schultz, the people that need it the most, the average american will feel this to the core. confidence is the corner stone. >> it makes you make decisions, big decisions, small decisions. i'm not going to buy that or do that, i'm scared to death. here's my question for the two of you. are more big ceos falling in line with the yes, let's raise the taxes on the 2%? >> if i don't know if a majority. would you say a majority? >> i think they want a deal and people have to make -- it's hard to make compromises. >> we've heard it from goldman sac sachs, warren buffett, schultz. >> big names there. >> they want clarity. the interesting thing to me, the stock market and bond market haven't freaked o
on january the 1st, the moment the fiscal cliff arrives. it's going to be a slow drip, drip, drip effect as people realize that slowing and spending, taxes go up. consumers are worried. it won't happen overnight. there's going to be no dramatic over the cliff we go. instead, you will see an evaporation of confidence. you will see an evaporation of business decision making and that is where the tumor and the cancer will begin. in the united kingdom, we've just had higher borrowing numbers and lower growth forecast. just last week, the ecb came out wi with dreadful, dreadful numbers on how the euro zone is performing and you want to play games with something as important as the u.s. budget. i'm going to finish here. the core worry is three weeks out and an inability to do a deal. >> so, it mabt come january 2nd or 30th, the catastrophe is long-term because of the erosion of confidence in the united states. >> it's happening -- it's happening now. >> we see it anytime jobs numbers. >> once you and i -- while you and i are enjoying our weekend, it is happening. >> were agreed. richard quest,
they're talking about is peanuts. president obama was in michigan today pushing his fiscal cliff plan. he made the solution sound so simple. >> when you put it all together, what you need is a package that keeps taxes where they are for middle class familiefamilies, w some tough spending cuts on things we don't need, and then we ask the wealthiest americans to pay a slightly higher tax rate. >> but not so fast, mr. president. we need a little more than you're talking about. president obama says his plan reduces the deficit by $4 trillion over ten years. forget the fact it counts war savings which shouldn't count. let's go with the $4 trillion. john boehner said his plan cuts $2.2 trillion over ten years. you shouldn't be comparing those two nubs. what you should think about is $16 trillion. that's how much debt the country has. according to bill groesdz, the man who runs the biggest fund, ie, the man who decides how much we can spend and borrow, we have to cut spending or raise taxes. that's $1.6 trillion a year. that's $1.2 trillion a year more than the president proposes. and $1.38
. charles, bring it round to the fiscal cliff because it's all interwoven here. it's all about basically where should government be spending money, where should cuts be made, and who ends up paying the lion's share of this. my sense is this will not go over the cliff and the reason it won't is that public opinion is now raging so hard against the republicans in all the polls that you see, they've lost the argument so why go over a cliff and make it worse for yourselves. >> i think you're right about that, because all of the polls i've seen say exactly what you're saying which is that the republicans will be blamed if we go over the cliff. but the first part of your question i think is the more crucial part of the question, which is how do you not cut off your nose to spite your face. if you do things, you make cuts that harm children who need to learn, who need to be able to go to school on a full stomach and be able to stay a whole day and have programs that will allow them to be competitive with children in china and india, if you need that to be a real situation in america for us to b
cliff is looming. if lawmakers don't come up with a deal, our taxes will go up and dramatic spending cuts will affect agencies across the board, and that includes the food and drug administration. emily schmidt explains what it could all mean for your food. >> susan, the federal government says americans spend about a trillion dollars a year on food. there are two agencies responsible for food safety. the job is the same with less funding to make it happen. >> preparing for the holidays in the bennett's house, is a reminder of something else, a fiscal cliff deadline that's personal here. >> i can't imagine funding being cut at this point, it will be tragic. >> chloe was in the hospital from two weeks, luke for three. >> contaminated food sickens about 48 million people a year. so the fda foot safety and administration service -- the budget cut translates to a combined $157 million. there's no word exactly what cuts would mean to expecter staffing. >> they're already stretched then when it comes to the inspection activities, they really need increased resources, and not fewers. >> age
't move on this the closer we get to the fiscal cliff. >> he says the president is slow walking. the president did an interview with abc news. what the president said to barbara walters. >> we have no make sure middle class taxes don't go up on january 1st. i'm confident that republicans wouldn't hold middle class taxes hostage to try to protect tax cuts for high-income individuals. >> he said he's fine to go over the fiscal cliff. all of those reasons would be reasons to say maybe we're not close to a deal on that do you think he'll get a deal before the end of the year? you are the optimistic one in the relationship here, or will we get one before you go off for christmas break? >> some type of deal. may not have a complete deal. but this issue of tax cuts for those earning less than 250,000, we will get that done. that is something we all agree on. and there may very well be parts of this that have to be done in 2013. again, we need to look at putting things in motion to get a complete deal done. we have to do it right. as far as tax cuts are concerns, we need to extend them
do it. make your mark with ink from chase. >>> just when you thought the fiscal cliff talks was at a standstill, boehner spent the day at the white house with obama, and we like to spend our afternoons with analysts. we have the senior writer for espn. good to see both of you. okay? >> yes. >> boehner had pretty tough words for the president on friday. let's listen. >> there is a lot of things possible to put the revenue on the table but none of it will be possible if the president insists on his position and insist on my way or the highway. >> anna, he also said the white house has wasted another week, and now two days later, they are meeting again. did boehner's remarks make the difference? >> good. i think it's great. we cannot reach a deal if you are posturing and negotiating through press conferences. they need to sit in a room and look at each other and talk constructive debate and move the ball forward. i think what happened today is a very good sign. americans should be encouraged, it's a good thing when the congressional leader and president is capable of meeting an
this report is very important. it's going to be driving the conversation on the fiscal cliff. we only have 25 days until the tax hikes and spending cuts start to take effect. here is the thing. this number came in much better than expected, don. so the bad part about this is that it may not motivate all those politicians on capitol hill as much as it may have, if it came in much weak er. this may not light the fire, so to speak. that could be the downside to the upside surprise to the number. don? >> alison, stick around. we'll get back to you as well. >>> from wall street now to washington where the white house is keep iing a close eye on today's numbers. brianna keilar joins us now live. good morning, brianna. >> reporter: good morning to you, don. we're still awaiting reaction from the white house and also from congssional republicans. they've long said at the white house, take a look at the trend of these nuchls over the month. so this number, paired with the last couple of months on its face, they will say the trajectory looks good, obviously more needs to be done. maybe the president ca
to the fiscal cliff and the more american jobs are placed in jeopardy. >> simultaneous tax hikes and spending cuts could happen at the start of the year if a deal isn't reached. nelson mandela is responding to treatment for a lung infection. that is according to statements from south african president zuma. he was rushed to the hospital over the weekend, 94 years old. >>> hugo chavez's six-hour surgery was apparently a success. chavez announced saturday his cancer has returned but he has never said what type of cancer he has. >>> near portland, oregon, police say this shopping mall was bustling with 10,000 people when a mass gunman believed to be in his 20s opened fire. witnesses say he fired at random, killing two people and leaving a third victim, quote, fighting for her life. shotgun blasts he cechoed throu the mall and sent them running for cover. >> i was inside applying for a job, and the next thing i know i see people running into sears and away from the middle of the mall saying they heard shots and there is a shooting going on. i wasn't sure if it was for real at first until i seen t
walks this process the closer the economy gets to the fiscal cliff. >> where are the revenues? where are the revenues? regardless of the cuts or changes of entitlements more is demanded in terms of what seniors would have to pay in to a medicare and what age that would happen. while the republicans refuse to touch one hair on the head of a the wealthiest people in our country. >> when it comes to taxes the top senate republicans said it was time for his party to give in and move on. >> what the president is trying to the achieve on the top two tax rates, you know, he can get by doing nothing. the law is certainly stacked in his favor. >> sharing the view a tack increase is all but inevitable. >> senator coburn is joining us now. you have said the tax rates are going up on the wealthiest 2% of a americans. it sounds like more republicans are coming around to your way of thinking. i understand you have been talking to republican colleagues about support ing this and insisting spending cuts. what level of support is there among your colleagues for a deal like that? >> actually what you
, most of us know by know the so-called fiscal cliff is looming and if lawmakers in washington don't come up with a deal our taxes will go up and dramatic spending cuts will affect agencies across the board and that includes the food and drug administration in charge of keeping what we eat safe. our emily schmidt explains what that means. >> there are two agencies responsible for food safety. under sequestration, the job's the same with less funding to make it happen. preparing for the holidays and paul and tress ya bennett's house is a reminder of something else around the corner, a fiscal cliff deadline that's personal here. >> i just can't imagine funding being cut at this point. it would be tragic. >> teresa is worried mandatory cuts would mean. >> closely was in the hospital for two weeks, luke, for three. >> she got listeria from food she ate while pregnant. it affected 48 million people a year. the fda and the food safety and inspection service are charged with inspecting the food supply. an 8.2% budget cut combines. there's no word exactly what cuts would mean to inspector staffin
should be done that should cost us more jobs. can you fix the fiscal cliff and send the economy downward. >> the fiscal cliff, isn't it having real impact in the economy now? >> it's having real impact and name pact will growth longer we take to come to a deal, some deal, any deal. what everybody wants, individuals who are going to be paid in january, they don't know how much and businesses, so what's the deal? what are -- what do we have to plan on? >> the best down payment would be to continue tax rates at the middle class for the rates they are, the best down payment. that's the best easy first step and i hope congress will realize take a step and take it now and give the president something he can sign. >> that has to be the last word. thanks, guys. >>> from the downward slope of the cliff to the upward climb on jobs, a big surprise in the november jobs numbers. it's a step in the right direction, but ali velshi will join me with a look at why we need to do much more. americans believe they should be in charge of their own future. how they'll live tomorrow. for more than 116 years, a
across the board taxes from everyone if we go over that fiscal cliff, you got to compromise. there's nothing wrong with compromise. to some liberals on the far left, conservatives on the far right, compromise is a dirty word. you should never compromise with the other side. they hate that. they rather go over the fiscal cliff but the overwhelming majority of americans totally disagree with those hard line positions on the extreme left and the extreme right. they want to compromise and they want a deal and they want the president and john boehner, the republican leadership and democratic leadership to come up with something that avoids going over the fiscal cliff. i think that's what that poll shows. >> let me change topics for a bit. news broke just before the program that republican senator jim demint is leaving. he decided to take over the heritage foundation. i have a question for you in that was this expected? he's a staunch conservative and opponent to craving into democrats and how do those things factor into a way ahead for republicans in the senate? >> i was surprised to he
in technology. >>> our fourth story, selling a fix. with just 22 days until the fiscal cliff kicks in and we all go sailing off. we're hearing a lot of talk about talking between the president and the house speaker. apparently, these talks are behind closed doors because they're talking over or at or something not good at each other. here is president obama today in detroit on his plan to raise taxes on families making more than $250,000 a year. >> that's a principle i won't compromise on because i'm not going to have a situation where the wealthiest among us, including folks like me, get to keep all our tax breaks. >> is the tough talk road show working for the president tonight? ben labolt is a former press secretary for the obama campaign. he had a vacation that's why he looks healthy now. and republican strategist terry holt. good to see both of you. terry, i want to start with you. the most recent poll we have "the washington post"/pew says by a margin of about 2 to 1, americans say republicans in congress will be to blame if there's not a deal on the fiscal cliff. so is the speaker losing
't act in good faith. but if there's no deal and the country goes over that fiscal cliff, taxes go up for everyone, mandatory spending cuts go into effect, a lot of folks are going to say where was the president? he was just re-elected. why couldn't he put together a package, a deal to avoid this disaster? >> i think this is a question of political leadership. and as that poll showed, there's no doubt that the president has the political advantage going into this. but at some point, and i think we're kind of getting close to it, the president has to be able to pivot and to say how do i turn this political advantage into a real policy accomplishment? and, wolf, i don't think you're going to do that with continued campaign style events like we just saw meeting with middle class families. okay. we get that. that occurred during the campaign. the white house has clearly gotten its message out. i think now there has to be a next step. you know, timing is everything in politics. and this is absolutely no different. what i'm getting from talking to some democrats on the hill is i think there
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